Tag Archives: Sports – football

Foosball – football’s/soccer’s cousin

Foosball international competition in Rouen, France in May 2018

Table football (EU/UK)/ table soccer (Australia/USA), which is also known as foosball, is a game for everyone (i.e. irrespective of age, gender and physical attributes). Playing foosball is a fun way to reunite with family, friends and colleagues. It brings out the competitive spirit in the players while making them mentally alert thinking of wise tactics to win the game. Therefore, if you want to be physically and mentally challenged, try foosball.

“Since this game involves the art and skill of coordinating your hands and eyes as well as keeping the body active, it is perfect to be done by all especially by people suffering from arthritis and brain injuries. In addition, foosball is a great rehabilitating sport for people with joint and bone problems. Aside from helping people in recovering from brain injuries as well as in joint and bone problems, foosball is not as tedious as other games and sports, thus, it does not cause too much pain on their part.” (https://foosballtablereview.com/benefits-and-reasons-to-start-playing-foosball/seen on 1/07/18).

Foosball is based on football/soccer, where 2 or 4 players try to hit a small ball into their opponent’s goal by turning rods with wooden figures then kick the ball downfield. Unlike football/soccer, there are no unified rules in foosball, i.e. there are different explicit regulations, styles of playing and table used in different countries. The Europeans generally use the Bonzini table (e.g. the Fédération Française de Football de Table in Rouen organised the World Series Bonzini in May 2018 — photo above) and emphasise quickness and skill “finesse”. The Americans have been using the Tornado brand for more than 30 years and focus on power and speed (I saw them play this way at Rouen last May).

While football/soccer is widely-known to have begun in 1863 in England, the origin of foosball is not clear. There have been some write ups pointing to its German history back in 1891 (foosball became its national competitive club sport the 1960s). So, foosball is most likely a German translation of «Tischfußball”.

In France, many brasseries and bistros have a table for foosball. Brasserie is an informal open restaurant that is often noisy and serve drinks and simple menus (e.g. soup, burgers and croque-monsieur). Whereas, bistros are small, intimate, and low-key as are they generally family-owned with the monsieur “the man/husband” as the cook and the madame “the woman/wife” as the manager of the cash registry and dining; or vice versa. In other European countries, particularly in the UK, foosball tables are found in pubs (derived from “public house”), which are drinking establishments fundamental to the Anglosphere culture. Since drinks are ordered from the counter and served by the bartender, it is a kind of bar except that it also serves simple meal/food.

Whether in brasseries, bistros or pubs, foosball enthusiasts eat, drink and play before, during or/and after their meals and drinks. You can hear a lot of laughter, cheers and sighs. Foosball can be an individual or collective game. It builds camaraderie, promotes fitness, and gives a sense of individual and team achievement. Some tournaments are held to raise money for good causes, such as to fund projects for sick and homeless people.

I don’t drink alcoholic beverages but go to brasseries, bistros and pubs for family and social outings, including watching foosball games. These places serve tea, coffee, fruit juices and water.

Schools and social/community centres should have foosball tables to provide diversity of choice when it comes to sports and entertainment. This will make foosball more accessible to those who don’t have extra money to go to brasseries and pubs; as well as prevent exposure to alcohol drinking.